1. 12:01 23rd Apr 2014

    Notes: 50179

    Reblogged from snakeeaters

    (Source: drop--ocean)

     
  2. 07:13 20th Apr 2014

    Notes: 156

    Reblogged from reptilefacts

    image: Download

    rhamphotheca:

TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Sulawesi Forest Turtle 
 Little is known about the critically endangered Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi). The species occurs in a very remote region of Indonesia, in the forest of North and Central Sulawesi. 
When spotted in the wild, they can be found along heavily wooded banks and in shallow clear streams. It is believed that their natural diet consists of various insects, leaves and fallen fruit. Because this species is so close to extinction in the wild, the TSA has made the management of a sustainable captive population a top priority. 
Read more about our work with this amazing species…
 (Turtle Survival Alliance) 
photograph credit: Sheena Koeth

    rhamphotheca:

    TSA Turtle Tuesday:  Sulawesi Forest Turtle

    Little is known about the critically endangered Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi). The species occurs in a very remote region of Indonesia, in the forest of North and Central Sulawesi.

    When spotted in the wild, they can be found along heavily wooded banks and in shallow clear streams. It is believed that their natural diet consists of various insects, leaves and fallen fruit. Because this species is so close to extinction in the wild, the TSA has made the management of a sustainable captive population a top priority.

    Read more about our work with this amazing species…

    (Turtle Survival Alliance)

    photograph credit: Sheena Koeth

     
  3. 04:29 9th Apr 2014

    Notes: 942

    Reblogged from herpin-my-derp

    image: Download

     
  4. 12:01 7th Apr 2014

    Notes: 209

    Reblogged from reptilefacts

    image: Download

    rhamphotheca:

Revision of the Pygmy Spiny-tailed Skinks (Egernia depressa species-group) from Western Australia, with descriptions of three new species  [2011]
Egernia depressa is an extremely spiny species of scincid lizard that occurs in several populations with highly variable morphology in western Australia. Using a combination of fixed morphological character differences and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, we found evidence for four species level groups within the complex.
We restrict E. depressa to the log-inhabiting population from south-western Australia and resdescribe the species, and describe three new species from the aridzone: two from the Pilbara and one from the central ranges. In addition to the genetic differences, thespecies differ in head size, limb length, tail shape, colouration and scalation.
Many of the morphological characters appear to be adaptations to log or rock-dwelling, with the log-dwelling E. depressa having brown colouration, large head, limbs and tail and long thin spines on the body and tail. The two Pilbara species are not each other’s closest relatives, yet they resemble each other the closest, probably owingto a suite of characters adapted for living in rock crevices such as yellow to reddish colouration, smaller head and limbs, narrower tail and short strong spines on the body and tail.
The central ranges species appears to have a combination of characters from log and rock-dwelling forms and is the most isolated of the four species.
read paper here.
(via: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)
photo: Henry Cook/flickr

    rhamphotheca:

    Revision of the Pygmy Spiny-tailed Skinks (Egernia depressa species-group) from Western Australia, with descriptions of three new species  [2011]

    Egernia depressa is an extremely spiny species of scincid lizard that occurs in several populations with highly variable morphology in western Australia. Using a combination of fixed morphological character differences and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, we found evidence for four species level groups within the complex.

    We restrict E. depressa to the log-inhabiting population from south-western Australia and resdescribe the species, and describe three new species from the aridzone: two from the Pilbara and one from the central ranges. In addition to the genetic differences, thespecies differ in head size, limb length, tail shape, colouration and scalation.

    Many of the morphological characters appear to be adaptations to log or rock-dwelling, with the log-dwelling E. depressa having brown colouration, large head, limbs and tail and long thin spines on the body and tail. The two Pilbara species are not each other’s closest relatives, yet they resemble each other the closest, probably owingto a suite of characters adapted for living in rock crevices such as yellow to reddish colouration, smaller head and limbs, narrower tail and short strong spines on the body and tail.

    The central ranges species appears to have a combination of characters from log and rock-dwelling forms and is the most isolated of the four species.

    read paper here.

    (via: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)

    photo: Henry Cook/flickr

     
  5. 12:01 2nd Apr 2014

    Notes: 98

    Reblogged from reptilefacts

    astronomy-to-zoology:

    Rubber Boa (Charina bottae)

    Also sometimes known as the Coastal Rubber Boa or the Northern Rubber Boa, the rubber boa is a species of boa (Boidae) that is native to the Western United States and Southwestern Canada. Rubber boas are known to inhabit a wide variety of habitats ranging from grassland, meadows and chaparral to deciduous and conifer forests, to high alpine settings. Rubber boas are notably docile and when threatened will release a potent musk instead of biting. Rubber boas are primarily nocturnal, but are also though to likely be crepuscular as well. Like other boas C. bottae is a predator and will feed on young mammals, eggs, and birds.

    Classification

    Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Serpentes-Boidae-Erycinae-Charnia-C. bottae

    Images: Dar-Ape and Kafziel

     
  6. 12:01 1st Apr 2014

    Notes: 203

    Reblogged from herpin-my-derp

    (Source: koaachan)

     
  7. 12:01 31st Mar 2014

    Notes: 1622

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    reptilesrevolution:

    Green Thornytail Iguana (Uracentron azureum)

    … an arboreal species of lizard from the Amazon rainforest and forests in the Guiana Shield. It is found in Colombia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, northeastern Peru, southern Venezuela and northern Brazil. It can reach about 9 cm (3.5 in) in snout–vent length… (Wikipedia)

     
  8. 12:01 30th Mar 2014

    Notes: 124

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    reptilefacts:

    Bitten by Leptodeira… ‘docile creatures’… with rear-fangs

    In May 2013 during the first two weeks of Project Chicchan surveys at Las Guacamayas, we were fortunate enough to find a Yucatán cat-eyed snake (Leptodeira frenata).

    I had seen a photo from the station of this species so I knew it was found here, but I had never seen one before. They are medium sized snake with maximum recorded length of around 70cm.

    The genus Leptodeira are widely accepted to be docile creatures and although they have rear-fangs at the back of the mouth and are mildly venomous they are not considered dangerous to humans and published literature suggests that only mild local swelling results from their bite.

    It was also in May 2013 that I was unfortunate enough to be bitten by the above snake on my middle finger, while handling the snake in the field. At first I was merely surprised as …

    (read more: Project Chicchan)

    *warning, somewhat gorey photo of a snake bite

     
  9. 12:01 27th Mar 2014

    Notes: 347122

    Reblogged from fencehopping

    Tags: Chameleonreptilesgif

    fencehopping:

    Chameleon hatching

     
  10. 12:01 25th Mar 2014

    Notes: 637

    Reblogged from thewildlifekingdom

    tiny-creatures:

Hyloscirtus princecharlesi, Prince CharlesStreamside frog, Imbabura Provice, Ecuador by Brad Wilson, DVM on Flickr.
     
  11. image: Download

    reptilesrevolution:

Geoemyda spengleri
[Reptarium]






Black-breasted leaf turtle

    reptilesrevolution:

    Geoemyda spengleri

    [Reptarium]

    • Black-breasted leaf turtle

     
  12. 12:01 13th Mar 2014

    Notes: 135

    Reblogged from reptiglo

    image: Download

    teleos:

Armstrong on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Male Sonoran gopher snake.

    teleos:

    Armstrong on Flickr.

    Via Flickr:
    Male Sonoran gopher snake.

     
  13. 04:02

    Notes: 10

    Reblogged from busterstroker

    Tags: transtop surgery

    busterstroker:

"Because the world is a much better place with Billy in it and the man needs to stand up straight as he walks through it."
Billy Needs Top Surgery

    busterstroker:

    "Because the world is a much better place with Billy in it and the man needs to stand up straight as he walks through it."

    Billy Needs Top Surgery

     
  14. 12:01 2nd Mar 2014

    Notes: 32

    Reblogged from reptilefacts

    image: Download

    hyacynthus:


Malagasy Tree snake (Stenophis betsileanus), Vohimana reserve, Madagascar by Frank.Vassen on Flickr.

Parastenophis betsileanus - the genus changed from Stenophis based on the work of Nagy et al. 2010.
Nagy, Z. T., Glaw, F. & Vences, M. 2010. Systematics of the snake genera Stenophis and Lycodryas from Madagascar and the Comoros. Zoologica Scripta 39:426–435.

    hyacynthus:

    Malagasy Tree snake (Stenophis betsileanus), Vohimana reserve, Madagascar by Frank.Vassen on Flickr.

    Parastenophis betsileanus - the genus changed from Stenophis based on the work of Nagy et al. 2010.

    Nagy, Z. T., Glaw, F. & Vences, M. 2010. Systematics of the snake genera Stenophis and Lycodryas from Madagascar and the Comoros. Zoologica Scripta 39:426–435.

     
  15. 12:01 23rd Feb 2014

    Notes: 250

    Reblogged from reptiglo

    reptiglo:

Dracaena guianensis: Peru by Javier_M. on Flickr.