1. The Mexican Mole Lizard (Bipes biporus)

    (Five-Toed Worm Lizard, Ajolote or Baja Worm Lizard)

    Species of aamphisbaenian. One of four amphisbaenians that have legs, and the only non-extinct species of animal to have only two limbs.

    (Source: calphotos.berkeley.edu)

     
  2. Slitherstition

    Photographer, Andrew McGibbon

    These images, then, are a result of my attempts to break down our suppositions of the animal. Photographed with warm light on bright colours, I am looking at their enchanting beauty and design, and their vulnerability, as creatures simply existing outside of the buckling pressure of the evil they are meant to represent.
     
    As with all victims of an ‘othering’ process, the serpent deserves a second look,
    beyond its slithering and dark hypnosis.
     
  3. Common File Snake - Gonionotophis capensis capensis

     

    (Source: behance.net)

     
  4. 12:01 22nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 1123

    Reblogged from reptilefacts

    image: Download

    libutron:

Lerista skinks and the evolution of limb loss
The Australian scincid clade Lerista (Scincidae) provides perhaps the best available model for studying limb reduction in squamates (lizards and snakes), comprising more than 75 species.
Among extant tetrapods, Lerista is exceptional in comprising a large number of closely-related species displaying prodigious variability of body form; several species possessing well-developed, pentadactyl limbs resemble typical non-fossorial scincids in body proportions, while many other species exhibit varying degrees of limb reduction and body elongation, including two that are highly elongate and entirely limbless.
Inferred phylogeny reveals extraordinary evolutionary mutability of limb morphology in Lerista. Ancestral state reconstructions indicate at least ten independent reductions in the number of digits from a pentadactyl condition.
An estimated age of 13.4 million years for Lerista entails that limb reduction has occurred not only repeatedly, but also very rapidly. At the highest rate, complete loss of digits from a pentadactyl condition is estimated to have occurred within 3.6 million years.
A relatively recent research about the phylogeny and evolution of Lerista, hypothesizes that an increase in the extent of seasonally dry and arid habitats coincident with the origination of the genus would have facilitated limb reduction and body elongation by furnishing an environment conducive to the adoption of fossorial habit.
The photo shows a Pilbara Flame-tailed Slider or Redtail Lerista, Lerista flammicauda, endemic to West Australia and found only in the Pilbara shrublands and the Western Australian Mulga shrublands.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos
Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

    libutron:

    Lerista skinks and the evolution of limb loss

    The Australian scincid clade Lerista (Scincidae) provides perhaps the best available model for studying limb reduction in squamates (lizards and snakes), comprising more than 75 species.

    Among extant tetrapods, Lerista is exceptional in comprising a large number of closely-related species displaying prodigious variability of body form; several species possessing well-developed, pentadactyl limbs resemble typical non-fossorial scincids in body proportions, while many other species exhibit varying degrees of limb reduction and body elongation, including two that are highly elongate and entirely limbless.

    Inferred phylogeny reveals extraordinary evolutionary mutability of limb morphology in Lerista. Ancestral state reconstructions indicate at least ten independent reductions in the number of digits from a pentadactyl condition.

    An estimated age of 13.4 million years for Lerista entails that limb reduction has occurred not only repeatedly, but also very rapidly. At the highest rate, complete loss of digits from a pentadactyl condition is estimated to have occurred within 3.6 million years.

    A relatively recent research about the phylogeny and evolution of Lerista, hypothesizes that an increase in the extent of seasonally dry and arid habitats coincident with the origination of the genus would have facilitated limb reduction and body elongation by furnishing an environment conducive to the adoption of fossorial habit.

    The photo shows a Pilbara Flame-tailed Slider or Redtail Lerista, Lerista flammicauda, endemic to West Australia and found only in the Pilbara shrublands and the Western Australian Mulga shrublands.

    References: [1] - [2] - [3]

    Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

    Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

     
  5. 12:01 21st Jul 2014

    Notes: 679

    Reblogged from reptilefacts

    libutron:

    Philippine Sailfin Lizard  (Crested Lizard, Sail-fin Lizard, Sailfin Water Lizard, Soa-soa Water Lizard)

    Hydrosaurus pustulatus (Agamidae) is a species of lizard notable not only for its impressive size of up to a meter in length, but also for its rather spectacular appearance.

    Adults of this large mottled greenish-grey lizard boast a well-developed crest of tooth-like scales from the nape of the neck down the back. However, the most distinctive feature of adult males is the erect ‘sail’ of skin at the base of their tail, up to 8 cm high, which provides propulsion for this strong swimmer to move through the water, and probably also plays an important role in territorial display and thermoregulation.

    This species, regarded as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, is endemic to the Philippines.

    Reference: [1] - [2]

    Photo credit: [Top: ©Shekainah D. Alaban | Locality: Masbate, Philippines] - [Middle: ©Shekainah D. Alaban | Locality: Masbate, Philippines]  -  [Bottom: ©Michael H. | Locality: Captive, Melbourne Zoo, Australia]

     
  6. 12:01 20th Jul 2014

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from pogosticks

    image: Download

    pogosticks:

Common Glossy Racer (Drymoluber dichrous) by Jake Scott
     
  7. image: Download

    In Microgravity, Some Snakes Tie Themselves in Knots, Others Attack Themselves

In microgravity, snakes lose their sense of proprioception, or the awareness of one’s body parts in relation to one another. Once the gravity wheels come off the wagon, snakes no longer seem to know their own bodies from any other physical obstacle they’re bouncing up against. They might perceive that obstacle as an enemy, or, if they think it’s another snake, they might try to bunch up alongside it, a common reaction in stressed groups of snakes, io9 explains. 

    In Microgravity, Some Snakes Tie Themselves in Knots, Others Attack Themselves

    In microgravity, snakes lose their sense of proprioception, or the awareness of one’s body parts in relation to one another. Once the gravity wheels come off the wagon, snakes no longer seem to know their own bodies from any other physical obstacle they’re bouncing up against. They might perceive that obstacle as an enemy, or, if they think it’s another snake, they might try to bunch up alongside it, a common reaction in stressed groups of snakes, io9 explains. 

     
  8. 12:01 19th Jul 2014

    Notes: 145

    Reblogged from rhamphotheca

    rhamphotheca:

libutron:

Sri Lankan Pipe Snake  (Ceylonese Cylinder Snake, Two Headed Snake, Depath naya)
As some other species in the genus Cylindrophis, this rare snake, Cylindrophis maculata (Cylindrophiidae), endemic to Sri Lanka, is distinctive by its small head not distinct from neck, covered with large symmetrical shields, its cylindrical body, and because the tail is short and blunt.
The body oh this snake is shiny and iridescent; dorsally it is dull brick red or orange with black network enclosing 35-55 pairs of spots. The head and the tail are black; and the neck region has a white ring around it. The ventral area is cream, white or light pink with black bars or may have variegated pattern.
The Sri Lankan Pipe Snake is a burrowing, nocturnal snake. They do not tend to bite and are very lazy, non aggressive and non venomous. When threatened they flatten their bodies and curl the tail forward with the head concealed under the body, resembling a snake with two heads (as seen in the photo).
 References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]
Photo: ©Chaminda Jayaratne
Locality: Kalutara, Western, Sri Lanka

Heh heh heh heh…

    rhamphotheca:

    libutron:

    Sri Lankan Pipe Snake  (Ceylonese Cylinder Snake, Two Headed Snake, Depath naya)

    As some other species in the genus Cylindrophis, this rare snake, Cylindrophis maculata (Cylindrophiidae), endemic to Sri Lanka, is distinctive by its small head not distinct from neck, covered with large symmetrical shields, its cylindrical body, and because the tail is short and blunt.

    The body oh this snake is shiny and iridescent; dorsally it is dull brick red or orange with black network enclosing 35-55 pairs of spots. The head and the tail are black; and the neck region has a white ring around it. The ventral area is cream, white or light pink with black bars or may have variegated pattern.

    The Sri Lankan Pipe Snake is a burrowing, nocturnal snake. They do not tend to bite and are very lazy, non aggressive and non venomous. When threatened they flatten their bodies and curl the tail forward with the head concealed under the body, resembling a snake with two heads (as seen in the photo).

     References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

    Photo: ©Chaminda Jayaratne

    Locality: Kalutara, Western, Sri Lanka

    Heh heh heh heh…

     
  9. image: Download

    Unidirectional pulmonary airflow patterns in the savannah monitor lizard
Emma R. Schachner, Biological Research & Scientific Illustration
And now for the topic of human lungs….
Madelyne’s journey to a second transplant - please consider donating
     
  10. 12:01 18th Jul 2014

    Notes: 204

    Reblogged from buggirl

    Tags: lizardreptile

    image: Download

    buggirl:

A very angry Anole one of the herpetologists is holding.  
Tiputini, Ecuador

    buggirl:

    A very angry Anole one of the herpetologists is holding. 

    Tiputini, Ecuador

     
  11. 12:01 17th Jul 2014

    Notes: 284

    Reblogged from reptiglo

    reptiglo:

    drawing-to-run:

    Dorsal action from my geckos :)

    I would be so terrified to bring mine outside, raven would be GONE.

     
  12. 12:01 16th Jul 2014

    Notes: 609

    Reblogged from reptiglo

    reptiglo:

    thedailyhobbes:

    I wanted to see more blue, so today he’s on a boring cream background!

    Definitely not happy, but definitely beautiful.

     
  13. image: Download

    Researchers try to save huge US salamander

…hellbenders, which can grow two or more feet long, are facing troubles bigger than an image problem. The aquatic creatures found only in swift-flowing, rocky rivers and streams are disappearing from large parts of the 16 states they inhabit.

Image Credit: A wild hellbender captured and released during a recent survey in southwest Virginia. Click photo to enlarge.  (Photos by J.D. Kleopfer, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries).

    Researchers try to save huge US salamander

    …hellbenders, which can grow two or more feet long, are facing troubles bigger than an image problem. The aquatic creatures found only in swift-flowing, rocky rivers and streams are disappearing from large parts of the 16 states they inhabit.

    Image Credit: A wild hellbender captured and released during a recent survey in southwest Virginia. Click photo to enlarge.  (Photos by J.D. Kleopfer, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries).

     
  14. 12:01 15th Jul 2014

    Notes: 51

    Reblogged from lioneater

     
  15. 12:01 14th Jul 2014

    Notes: 10

    Reblogged from pogosticks

    image: Download

    pogosticks:

Kimberley Rock Monitor (Varanus glauerti) by Brendan Schembri